Psychology
Bachelor of Science (BS)
Online Degree Program

The Bachelor of Science online degree program in Psychology is designed to provide students with an exploration of the multifaceted nature of human beings through the theories and principles relevant to the field.

Designed For You

The California Coast University online Bachelor of Science in Psychology program was designed for complete flexibility for the student. All courses are self-paced and completed 100% online.

View Program Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of the program, students will be able to:

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Explore The Program

The Bachelor of Science in Psychology degree program consists of 42 total courses.
The required courses are comprised of: 14  Core Courses > 14  General Ed Courses > 14  Elective Courses .
There are 126 total semester units in this program.

14 Core Courses

For the online Bachelor of Science in Psychology (B.S.) degree program, the following 14 courses must be fulfilled. Click on course title to expand and read more.

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ID Course Name Units
PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology  3

Introduction to Psychology introduces the methods and findings of contemporary psychology and investigates how psychological science can be applied to the world around us. Emphasizing the need for scientific and critical thinking, topics include a survey of biology and behavior, sensory processes, human development, learning and motivation. Emotion, personality, psychological disorders, therapy, and social interaction are also examined to provide students with a solid understanding of the facts, principles, and theories which make up the field of psychology.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Discuss the historical foundations of the field of psychology, the function of the brain on behavior, stages of human development, and psychology as a scientific field of study.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of processes related sensation and perception, states of consciousness, conditioning and learning, memory, cognition, language, and intelligence.
  • Examine motivation and emotion, sexuality and gender development, and personality development.
  • Evaluate psychological disorders and psychotherapies.
  • Examine key concepts related to the fields of health psychology and applied psychology.
  • Demonstrate proficiency with academic writing related to the field of psychology.
PSY 116 Psychology of Gender  3

Psychology of Gender examines the biological, cultural, and historical factors that influence the development of gender roles and identities. Stereotypes of masculinity and femininity are examined, and the impact that these ideas have on our lives at the personal, social, and institutional levels are explored.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Define sex, gender and gender identity, and discuss how gender movements have shaped history.
  • Examine biological, social, cognitive, emotional, and communicative factors related to gender development.
  • Evaluate issues related to gender stereotyping, discrimination, and power.
  • Describe the factors related to gender that affect health and wellbeing.
  • Demonstrate proficiency with academic writing related to the psychology of gender.
PSY 150 Health Psychology  3

Health Psychology examines the correlation between health, illness, and optimal health care from a behavioral science approach. The relationship between health and behavior is explored through an integration of foundational theories, relevant research, and “real-world profiles.”

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe and discuss the meaning and foundations of health psychology including the psychological and ethical aspects related to the field.
  • Analyze issues in behavioral health including the affects and impact of drugs and alcohol, eating, and exercise.
  • Describe the relationship between behavioral factors and strategies related to chronic disease, stress, pain, and illness.
  • Examine future trends and challenges in health psychology.
  • Demonstrate proficiency with academic writing related to health psychology.
PSY 180 Introduction to Organizational Psychology  3

Introduction to Organizational Psychology provides an introduction to industrial/organizational psychology and emphasizes the connections between theory and practice across the full spectrum of organizational behavior. The course covers job analysis, employee selection, and training and performance appraisal. Common worker issues are examined including motivation, job satisfaction, and stress. Group dynamics in the workplace including communication and group processes are explored, and topics such as leadership and power are analyzed as they relate to organizational structure.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Define industrial/organizational (I/O) psychology, key terminology, and discuss its origins as a field of study.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of theoretical perspectives of I/O psychology, and examine applications of motivational theories to organizational problems.
  • Evaluate the elements of I/O psychology including job analysis, performance management, criterion measurement, training, development, and the role of the leader.
  • Examine best practices along with future trends related to the field of I/O psychology.
  • Demonstrate proficiency with academic writing related to organizational psychology.
PSY 220 Developmental Psychology  3

Developmental Psychology introduces students to the scientific study of patterns of change and stability that occur as we move through the process of human development from conception to death. Various theories of development will be presented and an emphasis on physical, emotional, cognitive, and psychosocial changes throughout the lifespan will be discussed.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Define human development, discuss how it is studied, and examine the major theories and stages of development from infancy to late adulthood.
  • Examine the genetic, environmental, and physical factors related to the varying developmental stages.
  • Evaluate the factors of sensation, perception, cognition, memory, learning, intelligence, creativity, and language related to the varying developmental stages.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the self, personality, social and moral development, gender roles, sexuality, emotions, attachment, and relationships related to the varying developmental stages.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of unique factors related to developmental psychology, psychopathology, death, and bereavement.
  • Demonstrate proficiency with academic writing related to developmental psychology.
PSY 228 Social Psychology  3

Social Psychology offers students an in-depth look at how people come to understand themselves and others in a social context, with considerable emphasis on society’s role in social psychology. Each chapter in this course will introduce students to key individuals within the realm of social psychology whose research has made a significant contribution to the field.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Define the field of social psychology and describe its foundations, key terms, and theories.
  • Examine theoretical perspectives related to social psychology and research methodologies.
  • Evaluate the individual in society including stratification, self and identity, and socialization over the life course.
  • Analyze the various areas of social life.
  • Demonstrate proficiency with academic writing related to social psychology.
PSY 270 Learning Theories  3

Learning Theories offers a presentation of learning and behavior theory, methodology, and research relating to how and why humans and animals learn and behave as they do. The course provides a historical and theoretical foundation of learning theory that is necessary to fully appreciate modern forms of the psychology of learning. There is coverage of classic experiments, contemporary research, and real-world examples to help students confidently understand the learning process and its effect on behavior.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Define learning, key terms, and major theorists related to the field. Differentiate between learning and learned behavior.
  • Examine the processes of memory storage, retrieval, and forgetting.
  • Analyze the various principles, theories, and applications of conditioning, biological influences, and traditional learning theories.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of stimulus and cognitive control of behavior and the modification of instinctive behavior.
  • Demonstrate proficiency with academic writing related to learning theories.
PSY 280 Marriage and Family  3

Marriage and Family presents a representative summary of the literature of family therapy and the complex and changing social unit known as the family. Contemporary theories and issues in marriage and family therapy including communication, gender identity, love, choosing a partner, parenting, divorce, remarriage, and stepfamilies are all covered to help students become familiar with the ever-changing context of the American family.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Define family. Describe the functions of families and discuss the theoretical perspectives on family.
  • Discuss considerations when deciding about forming relationships, parenthood, and raising children in a diverse and changing society.
  • Understand the various roles, stereotypes, and power dynamics in marriages, families, and intimate relationships.
  • Examine how communication, gender, culture, religion, class, stress, power and sexuality affect marriages and intimate relationships.
  • Demonstrate proficiency with academic writing related to marriage and family.
PSY 312 Test and Measurements in Psychology  3

Tests and Measurements in Psychology introduces students to the study of psychological tests. The basic concepts and operations of testing are explored, and the theoretical considerations and applications of testing data are discussed. Students will become familiar with the various types of psychological tests and will have a basic understanding of how to administer and effectively apply them in their careers.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Define psychological testing, describe its importance, and analyze issues related to ethical issues related to psychological testing.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of psychometric principles and factors related to test reliability and validity.
  • Examine best practices for developing and piloting surveys and psychological tests.
  • Evaluate how tests are used in educational, clinical, and organizational settings.
  • Demonstrate proficiency with academic writing related to tests and measurements in psychology.
PSY 330 History and Systems of Psychology  3

History and Systems of Psychology provides students with a comprehensive overview of the origins of psychology from four disciplines including philosophy, biology, computational science, and social science. Factors and the people who influenced the evolution of the field of psychology from ancient cultures will be examined. In addition, this course will examine the role of current events and cultural changes which shape psychology today. Finally, this course will explore how emerging trends in the field of psychology continue to drive and shape the field moving forward.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Discuss psychology’s prehistory and foundational roots in the four parent disciplines: philosophy, biology, computational science, and social science.
  • Examine the key figures, trends, and ideas throughout history which contributed to the emergence of 21st century psychology.
  • Discuss the different influences on psychology from ancient cultures to modern times.
  • Evaluate the diverse aspects of the field of psychology including the biological, functional, and behavioral aspects.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the key aspects of personality, psychopathology, and cognitive psychology.
  • Demonstrate proficiency with academic writing related to the history and systems of psychology.
PSY 380 Personality Theories  3

Personality Theories presents an in-depth look at a number of classical and current personality theories, providing an explanation and interpretation of personality development from several different theoretical approaches. Classic theory is integrated with the latest research and current topics, preparing students to apply theoretical approaches to better understand the particular individuals and personalities they may encounter in their professional and personal lives.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Define personality and examine perspectives in theories of personality.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the major psychodynamic personality theories.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the major humanistic/existential personality theories.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the major biological/evolutionary, and learning-cognitive personality theories.
  • Describe and examine the research methods used in personality research.
  • Demonstrate proficiency with academic writing related to theories of personality.
PSY 408 Abnormal Psychology  3

Abnormal Psychology offers students an integrative approach to the study of psychopathology, drawing on contributions from various disciplines and theoretical stances. Through clinical case studies, the psychosocial and psychophysiological factors of abnormal behavior are examined, along with the exploration of prevention efforts and research-based advancements in the field.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Define abnormal behavior and describe the historical conceptions of abnormal behavior.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the various types of psychological disorders, their causes, and types of treatment.
  • Examine the processes of clinical assessment, diagnosis, and research in psychopathology.
  • Evaluate the legal and ethical issues that pertain to mental health services.
  • Demonstrate proficiency with academic writing related to abnormal psychology.
PSY 418 Counseling Psychology  3

Counseling Psychology addresses the history of counseling and the theory behind its practice, explores the multicultural, ethical, and legal environments in which counselors operate, and examines the variety of skills today’s counselors are expected to utilize.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the history of the counseling profession, and examine the role of counselors.
  • Describe how counselors are trained and regulated.
  • Examine the application of theories, research, and assessment in counseling.
  • Evaluate the legal, ethical, and cultural competency issues in counseling.
  • Analyze the global and societal trends in counseling.
  • Demonstrate proficiency with academic writing related to counseling psychology.
PSY 430 Educational Psychology  3

Educational Psychology focuses on the principles and theories related to human learning and motivation, child and adolescent development, individual and group differences, and psychological assessment related to classroom practice. The emphasis is placed on identifying, discussing, and summarizing core concepts and principles relevant in the American education system today.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe and examine the different types of research in classroom decision making.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of theories related to cognitive and linguistic development.
  • Describe best practices for culturally responsive teaching, promoting productive social skills, and adapting the classroom practices to students’ diverse personalities.
  • Examine the various views on learning and motivation.
  • Evaluate the various classroom strategies for instruction and assessment.
  • Demonstrate proficiency with academic writing related to educational psychology.
14 General Ed. Courses

For the online Bachelor of Science in Psychology (B.S.) degree program, the following 14 courses must be fulfilled. Click on course title to expand and read more.

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14 Elective Courses

For the online Bachelor of Science in Psychology (B.S.) degree program, you will select 14 courses to take from the list of courses below. Click on course title to expand and read more.

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Prerequisites to Admission:

The applicant should meet the following prerequisites in order to be admitted to the program: An applicant must be at least 18 years of age and have successfully obtained a high school diploma, GED, or its equivalent.

FAQ About Coursework

Required units may be satisfied in the following ways: