General Studies
Bachelor of Science (BS)
Online Degree Program

The Bachelor of Science online degree program in General Studies is committed to helping students develop a broad-based education in the field of business, psychology, criminal justice, and general education.

Designed For You

The California Coast University online Bachelor of Science in General Studies program was designed for complete flexibility for the student. All courses are self-paced and completed 100% online.

  • Low tuition with interest-free payment plans as low as $100/month.
  • Flexible programs designed to fit into your busy schedule. Self-paced study with no group projects, set meeting times, or exam dates.
  • The program is not structured in semesters, quarters, or terms. It is designed to allow students to begin their online studies at any time of the year.
  • CCU offers a tuition discount for Active Duty Military, Veterans, Law Enforcement, Firefighters, Government Employees, and CCU Graduates.
    We also offer a 10% discount for Corporate Partner employees. For more information on how to become a Corporate Partner, see our Corporate Partnership Information Page.
    *Employment verification is required. Offer good for students who enrolled after April 2018 and were offered discount at time of enrollment. Offer is not retroactive for students already enrolled. Discount and/or prices subject to change and/or cancellation at any time without notice. This offer cannot be combined with any other discount(s).
View Program Outcomes:

Upon successful completion of the program, students will be able to:

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Explore The Program

The Bachelor of Science in General Studies degree program consists of 42 total courses.
The required courses are comprised of: 14 Core > 14 General Ed > 14 Elective .
There are 126 total semester units in this program.

14 Core Courses

For the online Bachelor of Science in General Studies (B.S.) degree program, the following 14 courses must be fulfilled. Click on course title to expand and read more.

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ID Course Name Units
BAM 105 Introduction to Business  3

Introduction to Business introduces the business world and the contemporary environment in which it operates. How business operations are managed and organized will be explored and the basic ideas of marketing processes and consumer behavior will be discussed. Additionally, students will become aware of the changing face of business, with its current technological and management information system advances.

Course Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe the contemporary business environment.
  • Explain how businesses and business operations are managed and organized.
  • Describe the importance of people within organizations.
  • Relate the principles of marketing, including marketing processes and consumer behavior.
  • Understand the importance of managing information systems and electronic commerce; understand principles of accounting.
  • Explain the financial issues facing business today, including money, banking, securities and investments.
BAM 225 Information Management  3

Information Management is an introductory course designed to provide in-depth coverage of essential concepts and important terminologies. Topics include information management, the value chain and value web models, the principles of a database management system, the principal technologies and standards for wireless networking, communication, and Internet access, and the relationships among ethical, social, and political issues that are raised by information systems. This course also examines e-commerce and how social tools, mobile technology, and location-based services are transforming marketing and advertising.

Course Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Describe how information systems contribute to and operate in the business environment.
  • Determine how hardware, software, and various kinds of networks contribute to information technology.
  • Distinguish what is meant by Big Data.
  • Examine the Internet of Things as well as cloud computing.
  • Identify ways that information systems contribute to personal productivity, problem solving, business operations, and management decision making.
  • Summarize the information system development process.
  • Explain how social networking in e-commerce works.
BAM 312 Business Communications  3

Business Communications covers the fundamental dimensions of communication: language and behavior. Alternatives for conveying messages are discussed. The course also covers, in detail, the various channels and media for business communication, with guidelines for effective and successful use of each.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Show an understanding of the fundamentals of effective business communication and the writing process.
  • Write successful business letters, memos, e-mail correspondence and other short messages.
  • Gather information and communicate it effectively through writing, visuals and new technologies such as the Internet.
  • Plan and write formal reports and proposals.
  • Design and present effective oral presentations.
  • Create persuasive employment documents and display an understanding of successful interview techniques.
BAM 315 Principles of Management  3

Principles of Management serves as an introduction to the discipline of management. It is designed to integrate the accepted theories in the area with real world applications to provide students with the basic knowledge and skills needed for managing others. This course begins with a discussion of the current issues in management and then proceeds to cover the traditional functions of management: planning, organizing, leading, and controlling. By the end of this course, students should have an understanding of the needs of modern public and private organizations, including emerging national and international trends.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the principles of managing formal organizations.
  • Recognize the various challenges faced by today’s managers.
  • Give examples of organizations engaging in the management functions of planning, organizing, leading and controlling.
BAM 350 Project Management  3

Project Management will introduce students to critical components of project environments. Through numerous examples, students will be able to understand how project management concepts and techniques can be skillfully applied to real-world scenarios. Topics include project management life cycle and process, developing a project proposal, techniques for planning, scheduling, resource assignment, budgeting, and controlling project performance, project risks, project manager responsibilities and skills, project team development and effectiveness, project communication and documentation, and project management organizational structures.

Course Objectives:

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Explain the basic foundations of project management concepts and vocabulary.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of selecting, planning, performing, and controlling projects.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of project scheduling and budgeting.
  • Evaluate project risks and how to monitor and manage the risks.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of project management skills, teamwork, and the organizational structures in which project management takes place.
BAM 410 Organizational Theory and Behavior  3

Organizational Theory and Behavior emphasizes the relationships among individuals, groups, organizations, and society. It presents a dynamic, systems approach to understanding and facilitating work relationships. Emphasis is given to the interaction of individual values, attitudes, needs, abilities, traits, and motivation within teams and organizations.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Identify the challenges and opportunities managers have in applying Organizational Behavior (OB) concepts.
  • Compare the functional and dysfunctional effects of organizational culture on people and the organization.
  • Contrast leadership and power in organizations.
  • Explain the key elements of motivation as well as theories of motivation.
  • Describe the main functions of communication.
  • Assess ways organizations can manage planned and unplanned changes.
BCJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice  3

Introduction to Criminal Justice aims to provide students with a general understanding of the criminal justice system’s response to crime in society. It is important to note that the general theme of this course involves the delicate balance between community interests and individual rights that criminal justice decision-making requires. This theme will be explored by examining the criminal justice process in some detail, focusing on how the system is structured to respond to crime.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Explore the history of crime in America and corresponding changes in the American criminal justice system.
  • Explain how multiculturalism and diversity present special challenges to, and opportunities for, the American system of criminal justice.
  • Examine the development of criminological theory including the role of social research in that development.
  • Describe the development of American courts including the concept of the dual-court system.
  • Consider the history of punishments and its impact on the modern philosophy of corrections.
BCJ 240 Procedures in the Justice System  3

Procedures in the Justice System covers the fundamental principles and procedures employed in the investigation of crimes. The course connects criminal procedure cases to the real world through innovative pedagogy and encourages critical thinking. This course is designed to help students develop a working knowledge of the steps of investigation, beginning with the initial security of the crime scene and concluding with the presentation of evidence and proper testimony in court in such a way as to make the concepts easy to apply to any state’s specific procedural laws.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Discuss the law of constitutional criminal procedures.
  • Understand criminal procedures in its social, political, and historical contexts.
  • Review the purposes and rules that emerge from cases.
BCJ 360 Criminal Law  3

Criminal Law provides students with an overview of general legal principles and an understanding of the historical development of criminal law and its contemporary form and function in American society today. This course offers a comprehensive study of the historical background, social values, moral standards, and political realities that give direction to the American system of justice.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Examine basic criminal law terminology.
  • Compare the types of defenses, including perfect and imperfect defenses.
  • Differentiate physiological, psychological, and sociological excuse defenses.
  • Distinguish types of murder and manslaughter.
  • Describe the crimes of assault and battery.
  • Analyze how criminal law could control terrorism.
HCA 200 The United States Health Care System  3

The United States Health Care System course is designed to introduce students to the organization, structure, and operation of the nation’s health care system. This course aims to help students effectively identify their present and future roles as consumer, provider, manager, decision-maker, and analyst. The class examines an overview of the health care system, causes and characteristics of health service utilization, the nature of wellness and disease, individual provider settings, financial and nonfinancial resources used and needed, and measurement of quality of care.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of those factors that make health care delivery in the United States unique.
  • Discuss the relationship between health care and the economy.
  • Describe the role of the government on the delivery of health care in the United States.
  • Discuss the impact of the “Aging of America” on the delivery and cost of health care.
  • Identify major challenges for our health care system of the future and formulate strategies to meet these challenges.
MKT 230 Consumer Behavior  3

Consumer Behavior explores not only the act of buying, but it also investigates how having—or not having—a product, service, idea, or experience affects our lives, how we view ourselves, and how we view others. This course examines consumer behavior as an ongoing process and includes discussions about current marketing trends—how consumers and technology have affected marketing, and how new marketing has affected consumers and their social environment.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Understand the psychological foundations of consumer behavior.
  • Apply the mechanisms of influence that are most likely to lead consumers to change their attitudes, their beliefs, and, most importantly, their actions.
  • Analyze how products and commercial messages often appeal to our senses.
  • Understand how consumers learn about products and services.
PSY 220 Developmental Psychology  3

Developmental Psychology introduces students to the scientific study of patterns of change and stability that occur as we move through the process of human development from conception to death. Various theories of development will be presented and an emphasis on physical, emotional, cognitive, and psychosocial changes throughout the lifespan will be discussed.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Define the lifespan perspective.
  • Identify the emotional and cognitive changes that occur during each developmental period.
  • Examine the physical and psychological changes that occur during a person’s lifetime.
  • Review the social and personality characteristics of each age group.
PSY 408 Abnormal Psychology  3

Abnormal Psychology offers students an eclectic, multicultural approach to abnormal behavior, drawing on contributions from various disciplines and theoretical stances. The psychosocial and psychophysiological factors of abnormal behavior are examined, and the causes and classifications are discussed. Case vignettes and client experiences will be explored and combined with research-based explanations of abnormal behavior.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Successfully discriminate between normal and abnormal behavior and identify the symptoms of various disorders.
  • Understand the various causes, symptoms and treatment of abnormal behavior.
  • Understand the basics of the DSM system and how it’s used.
  • Summarize issues related to mental health and treatment.
PSY 430 Educational Psychology  3

Educational Psychology focuses on the principles and theories related to human learning and motivation, child and adolescent development, individual and group differences, and psychological assessment related to classroom practice. The emphasis is placed on identifying, discussing, and summarizing core concepts and principles relevant in the American education system today.

Course Objectives

Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

  • Review cognitive, linguistic, personal, and social development of school-aged children, along with the respective theories.
  • Describe ways to facilitate effective learning strategies.
  • Recognize the roles that motivation has on learning.
  • Explain how teachers can promote a productive learning environment for their students.
14 General Ed. Courses

For the online Bachelor of Science in General Studies (B.S.) degree program, the following 14 courses must be fulfilled. Click on course title to expand and read more.

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14 Elective Courses

For the online Bachelor of Science in General Studies (B.S.) degree program, you will select 14 courses to take from the list of courses below. Click on course title to expand and read more.

[View Course List]

Prerequisites to Admission:

The applicant should meet the following prerequisites in order to be admitted to the program: An applicant must be at least 18 years of age and have successfully obtained a high school diploma, GED, or its equivalent.

FAQ About Coursework

Required units may be satisfied in the following ways:

  • California Coast University has developed comprehensive Study Guides, for each course, that are designed to coordinate and sequence the learning materials within the required textbook. The following points will help to illustrate how the Study Guides are designed:

    • Study Guides are based on specific college level textbooks, which may be obtained from local bookstores, the publisher, or the University's Rental Library.
    • Each Study Guide is organized with a complete syllabus, along with instructional materials to guide the student chapter by chapter through the corresponding textbook.
    • Each Study Guide contains an overview and summary of all textbook chapters, along with a listing of important keywords (with definitions), and self-tests (with answers) on key points.
    • Study Guides include 4 unit exams equally spaced throughout the instructional materials, one writing assignment per unit, and the final examination.
    • Examinations are designed to test the student on the information contained within the preceding chapters.
    • All tests have no time limit and may be completed as open book tests.
  • California Coast University recognizes that not all learning occurs through a college or university. Therefore, it is possible to receive academic credit based on previously completed specialized training. The following guidelines are utilized when evaluating specialized training:

    • Documented training such as those a student may have completed through their employer, company, organization, military training experiences, professional or personal licensure requirements or other documented training experiences may be eligible for academic credit.
    • Eligibility for specialized training is assessed at the application stage of the enrollment process. All supporting documentation of prior training is reviewed for equivalent elective credit.
    • Students have 45 days from the date of enrollment to submit documents for specialized training credit. If applicable, credits will be awarded and tuition will be adjusted accordingly.
    • For specialized training documents received after the initial 45 days, there will be a re-evaluation fee of $75.00 charged. Any academic credit awarded will be applied to the student's program, but there will be no tuition adjustments made after the initial 45 days of enrollment.
    • Specialized training credit can be utilized to meet elective course requirements only.

    *Savings based on the ability to satisfy 10 elective courses using specialized training credit.

  • Transcripts of previously completed academic work are evaluated and credit may be transferred to meet existing coursework requirements. The following guidelines are utilized when accepting transfer credit for a bachelor's degree program:

    • The University will accept transfer credit from applicable courses completed at colleges or universities accredited by an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of Education or foreign equivalent.
    • Bachelor degree students may receive transfer credit for up to 93 semester units.
    • To be eligible for undergraduate academic credit, transfer grades must be equivalent to a letter grade of C (2.0 GPA) or higher.
  • During the admissions process, all professional experience is reviewed to determine if an applicant has sufficient occupational experience to warrant completing a Challenge Examination in lieu of a Study Guide for a particular course. The following factors are considered:

    • An applicant may be offered an opportunity to complete a Challenge Examination if the candidate's occupational expertise appears to be comparable to the objectives identified for a particular course.
    • Successfully passing a Challenge Examination will demonstrate an acceptable level of competence for that course.
    • If a student does not pass a Challenge Examination they are assigned a Study Guide for completion.
    • The maximum amount of Challenge Examinations allowed for each program level are: Associate 4; Bachelor's 10; Master's 2; Doctorate 0; and Certificates 1.
  • Experiential learning allows undergraduate students to receive credit for experiential learning in the major field of study (core courses) only. The following guidelines are utilized when offering the opportunity for experiential learning credit:

    • Eligibility for experiential credit is determined at the application stage of the enrollment process.
    • The applicant’s educational background and work history are reviewed and an assessment is made indicating which courses may be eligible for credit by experiential learning.
    • If it is determined that a particular course is eligible for credit by experiential learning, the student will submit supporting information on past professional experience and training to justify the award of academic credit. This information may be provided any time during the academic program.
    • Regular tuition applies for all courses offered through experiential credit.
    • If a student has been offered the opportunity to request experiential credit, but would prefer to complete a challenge examination or study guide, he or she may do so by making a request in writing to the Student Success Center.
    • No letter grade is given for experiential credit courses.
    • Bachelor level students may receive up to 30 semester units of credit for core courses.
    • No experiential credit is awarded to students enrolled in a certificate, master’s or doctoral program.