Associate of Science in Health Care Administration (A.S.)

Connect Now

phone Call: 1 888 228-8648

Apply for Admission

Request Information

Send a Message

Find us @ social-FB_off social-GP_off social-TW_off social-IN_off

Find Your Path To Success

 
h4_bg

Program Objectives:

Upon successful completion of the program, students will be able to:

  • Express an understanding of the organization, structure, and operation of the nation’s health care system.
  • Identify the roles of consumers, providers, managers, decision makers, and analysts in the health care system.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the key aspects of information technology, cultural diversity and medical law and ethics in relation to health care administration.
  • Identify the ways in which leaders and managers influence organizational culture, performance and change.
  • Express key concepts and theories related to health care administration, in written form, utilizing prescribed essay criteria.
  • Demonstrate knowledge in the areas of science, social sciences, arts and humanities, and basic subjects including mathematics, English, U.S. history and government.
h4_bg
course-icon-A

Associate of Science in Health Care Administration (A.S.)

The Associate of Science online degree program in Health Care Administration is designed to provide students with a foundation in the theories and principles integral to the management and administration in a health care environment.

The Associate of Science degree program in Health Care Administration is:

  • a self-paced learning program;
  • completed off-campus;
  • online learning format;
  • not structured in semesters, quarters or terms; and
  • designed to allow students to begin their online Health Care Administration studies at any time of the year.

**Military students and some employers require students to complete courses on a per term basis.  Please contact our Admissions Department for additional information.  

The Associate of Science degree in Health Care Administration requires students to complete a total of 60 semester units comprised of the following:

  •   6 core courses;
  • 10 general education courses; and
  •   4 elective courses.

**Requirements are fulfilled through coursework completed at California Coast University, coursework completed at other recognized educational institutions, and/or professional/specialized training.  Previously completed coursework and training will be evaluated to determine all applicable transfer credit. Individual requirements may vary based on transfer credit or specialized training. 

    Associate of Science in Health Care Administration (A.S.) Core Courses

    Courses required are listed below. Please click on the course to read a description.

    plus-sign HCA 200 The United States Health Care System

    3 Semester Units

    The United States Health Care System course is designed to introduce students to the organization, structure, and operation of the nation’s health care system. This is done to help students identify more effectively their present and future roles as consumer, provider, manager, decision maker, and analyst. The class examines an overview of the health care system, causes and characteristics of health service utilization, nature of wellness and disease, individual provider settings, financial and nonfinancial resources used and needed, measurement of quality of care, and current issues in delivery.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Understand the organization, structure, and operation of the nation’s health care system.
    • Identify more effectively present and future roles as consumers, providers, managers, decision makers, and analysts.
    • Understand the causes and characteristics of health service utilization, nature of wellness and disease, individual provider settings, financial and non-financial resources used and needed, measurement of quality of care, and current issues in delivery.
    • Understand the fundamental goals of providing cost-effective, high-quality care to all Americans.

     

    plus-sign HCA 305 Introduction to Community Health

    3 Semester Units

    Introduction to Community Health allows students to reflect on the latest trends and statistics in community health in an effort to effectively address the health issues facing today’s communities. With emphasis on developing the knowledge and skills necessary for a career in health care, the course covers such topics as epidemiology, community organization, program planning, minority health, health care, mental health, environmental health, drugs, safety and occupational health.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Explain the history and current issues facing community health.
    • Discuss the prevention and control of hazardous health conditions.
    • Explain ways to build and organize a community health promotion plan.
    • Describe the importance of school health programs.
    • Explain the concept of diversity in health care delivery.

     

    plus-sign HCA 310 Information Technology for Health Professions

    3 Semester Units

    Information Technology for Health Professions provides a general introduction to computer literacy and information technology at a level appropriate for health care students. It includes discussions of hardware and software, communications and networking, ethical issues, and privacy concerns. In addition, it discusses how IT is transforming every aspect of health care–from administrative applications (such as the electronic medical record), to clinical systems involved in direct patient care, to special purpose applications (such as simulation software used in the education of health care professionals).

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Summarize new developments in clinical and special purpose applications of IT to health care.
    • Describe the legal, licensing, insurance, and privacy issues involved in telemedicine.
    • Describe demographic changes and their impact on occupational outlooks for health care professionals.
    • Examine the social implications of the applications of information technology to health care.

     

    plus-sign HCA 320 Essentials of Managed Health Care

    3 Semester Units

    Essentials of Managed Health Care provides a systematic overview of organizational principles, practices, and insights pertinent to the management of health services organizations. This course will go beyond the traditional focus of health care on hospitals and other provider organizations to include suppliers, buyers, regulators, public health and financing organizations.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Comprehend the scope of organizational theory and practice in the health care management industry.
    • Discuss the distinctive challenges facing health care organizations globally.
    • Analyze multiple organizational approaches from different perspectives.
    • Understand the roles of leaders and managers in influencing organizational culture, performance and change.

     

    plus-sign HCA 340 Cultural Diversity in Health and Illness

    3 Semester Units

    This course promotes an awareness of the dimensions and complexities involved in caring for people from diverse cultural backgrounds. The course will review the latest information on the health care delivery system.  It examines the differences existing within North America by probing the health care system and consumers, and explores examples of traditional health beliefs and practices among selected populations. An emphasis on the influences of recent social, political, and demographics changes helps to explore the issues and perceptions of health and illness today.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Recognize the cultural phenomena affecting health and describe cultural competency.
    • Understand the issues related to health care reform.
    • Describe the types of folk medicine.
    • Discuss the current health care problems in Asian/Pacific Islander communities, American Indian communities, Hispanic-American communities, and African American communities.

     

    plus-sign HCA 420 Medical Law and Ethics

    3 Semester Units

    Medical Law and Ethics explores the study of medical ethics, or applied ethics, for healthcare professionals who often face dilemmas that are not experienced by the general population. The fast-paced growth of medical technology has made the study of ethics even more relevant. The study of bioethics, or biomedical ethics, refers to moral dilemmas due to advances in medicine and medical research. Since medical law and ethics are often interrelated, students need to have a clear understanding of both in order to protect themselves, their employer, and the patient. The study of ethics includes many questions for which there is no one answer.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe the similarities and differences between laws and ethics.
    • Discuss the difference between ethics and bioethics.
    • Describe how to apply the three decision-making models discussed in this text.

     

    Associate of Science in Health Care Administration (A.S.) General Education Courses

    Courses required are listed below. Please click on the course to read a description.

    plus-sign GED 102 The Human Body (Natural Sciences)

    3 Semester Units

    The Human Body is intended for students who are interested in gaining a basic understanding of the human body—its shape, structure, parts—and how these various components work and function. With this knowledge, students will be able to see how such information can be used to diagnose and treat various diseases.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Understand the function and structure of the human body.
    • Distinguish between the various types of diseases.
    • Examine the interrelationships of all body systems.

     

    plus-sign GED 108 Environmental Science (Natural Sciences)

    3 Semester Units

    Environmental Science is an interdisciplinary approach to environmental sci­ence, focusing on the interrelatedness of humans and the natural world. Historical perspectives, economic and political realities, var­ied social experiences and ethnic backgrounds are integrated into the identification of major issues and the search for possible solutions.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Define sustainability, sound science and stewardship—the three unifying themes in environmental science.
    • Examine the international and U.S. measures taken to mitigate climate change and evaluate their effectiveness.
    • Evaluate how our national energy policies encourage both renewable energy and energy conservation.
    • Explain how the science of ecology can be described as a hierarchy of questions, describe the questions different types of ecologists ask, and anticipate different experiments they might do, all within the same natural systems.

     

    plus-sign GED 215 Psychology of Adjustment (Social Sciences)

    3 Semester Units

    Psychology of Adjustment explores major perspectives on psychology and pro­vides opportunities for students to apply useful concepts to their personal lives. Content is drawn from theory and research in dif­ferent areas of psychology and covers personality development, stress management, health issues, relationships, work, life span development and other areas of life.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Understand how society and technology today have far reaching effects on social change
    • Understand the stages of lifespan development
    • Explore various venues to manage emotions and the dynamics of relationships, as well as sexuality in our society
    • Learn and understand group dynamics
    • Understand the stages of love and commitment
    • Describe the features of a psychological disorder and discuss the prevalence and incidence of various disorders
    • Describe and understand the various psychological approaches for treatment
    • Identify and explain the models of grief work

     

    plus-sign GED 216 Introduction to Sociology (Social Sciences)

    3 Semester Units

    Introduction to Sociology is a study of how society influences the way people act, think and feel. Culture, society, social interactions, social class and gender stratification all influence every part of who people are, how they behave and how they participate in their existence on this earth. An introduction to social problems including minority inequality, aging and death, women’s rights and urban problems, in general, is also explored.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Discover a fresh and exciting way to see yourself within the larger social world.
    • Understand that the United States and other rich nations cast long shadows affecting social life in poorer nations around the world.
    • Discover how to apply sociology in your everyday life.

     

    plus-sign GED 120 Introduction to Humanities (Humanities/Fine Arts)

    3 Semester Units

    Introduction to Humanities explores the conduct of human life with emphasis on understanding the aesthetic sense—an important element in the art of being human. The course focuses on key events, styles, movements and figures of Western art, philosophy and religion, which are all essential to exploring the aesthetic human experience. Students will learn to think critically about how past themes, movements and creative geniuses have impacted—and still influence—the modern world which we live in today.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Assess the features that characterize the beginnings of human cultures.
    • Explore the rise of Christianity and other major religions.
    • Compare and contrast the similarities and differences between the French and the American revolution.
    • Analyze the postmodern era.

     

    plus-sign GED 240 Art History (Humanities/Fine Arts)

    3 Semester Units

    This course examines the visual arts including painting, sculpture, printmaking, photography, and architecture from prehistory to the present. While emphasis is placed on the arts of Europe and the United States, those of Africa and Asia are also discussed.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Be familiar with the different types of visual arts, media, and techniques.
    • Understand the development of art across regions and time periods.
    • Understand the relationship of art to historical events and religion.
    • Be familiar with the role of artists and patrons and the development of the art market.
    • Be able to describe, analyze, and research a work of art using the appropriate terminology.

     

    plus-sign GED 132 United States Government (Basic Subjects)

    3 Semester Units

    United States Government reviews and examines the institutions of the American political system: the presidency, Congress, the judiciary and state and local governments. It also examines political parties and the roles they have played in the development of the American polyarchy.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Classify and explain the politics of different issues.
    • Analyze how power is divided between the national government and the states under the Constitution.
    • Assess how legislative productivity of the U.S. Congress has varied over time.
    • Evaluate why environmental policies are designed and enforced differently in America than in other industrialized nations.
    • Assess how the challenge of political leadership has changed since the days of the Constitutional Convention.

    plus-sign GED 150 Mathematics (Basic Subjects)

    3 Semester Units

    Mathematics provides an introduction to college mathematics by building essential skills one at a time. The course starts with the basics of whole numbers, fractions and decimals and then moves into basic geometry, statistics and concludes with an introduction to algebra. This course is complete with examples, exercises, and practice problems to ensure your success.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Apply addition, subtraction, multiplication, division and fractions to real life situations.
    • Estimate sums, differences, products, and quotients of decimals.
    • Solve applied problems involving metric and American units.
    • Find the mean, median and mode of a set of numbers.
    • Solve problems involving comparisons, geometric formulas, and rates and percents.

     

    plus-sign GED 155 English (Basic Subjects)

    3 Semester Units

    English will help students to develop the key skills that will make them good communicators and valued members of the workforce: reading and comprehending, building a substantial vocabulary, using grammatically correct English and speaking and writing the language that is necessary for success in the workplace. This course is designed to help all levels of students from those with language skill deficiencies, or English as a second language, to professionals and businesspeople.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe the basic parts of speech used in standard English.
    • Recognize the various components of speech used in a sentence.
    • Explain how to use various types of reference tools to aid in writing.
    • Compose a business letter, memo, e-mail and essay.

     

    plus-sign GED 232 Early U.S. History (Basic Subjects)

    3 Semester Units

    Early U.S. History explores the history of the United Sates from native American societies before 1492 to the year 1877, with an in-depth analysis of the transition in United States history from pre-colonial beginnings to an independent national state. This course will survey the historical, cultural, political and economic events that shaped early United States history.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Discuss the various groups of Europeans that immigrated to the American colonies during the eighteenth century and understand how these groups add to the complexity and diversity of the American colonial population.
    • Explain the impact of the American Revolution on the status of women, African Americans, and Native Americans.
    • Outline the major points of both the religious and racial justifications for slavery and explain the circumstances in which each argument was more likely to be used.
    • Explain the long-term impact of the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments as protections against racial discrimination.

     

    Associate of Science in Health Care Administration (A.S.) General Elective Courses

    Courses required are listed below. Please click on the course to read a description.

    plus-sign MKT 102 Introduction to Marketing

    3 Semester Units

    Introduction to Marketing introduces leading marketing concepts on how customer value is the driving force behind every marketing strategy. Social, legal, economic, ethical and technological influences around the globe must be recognized and considered for effective marketing to occur. Students will learn how to recognize and implement these influences in their marketing strategies, and will be able to effectively navigate the complex world of marketing in a practical, approachable, and enjoyable way.

    Course Objectives

     

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Define marketing and the marketing process.
    • Have an understanding of the Marketplace of Consumers.
    • Design a customer-driven marketing strategy and marketing mix.
    • Understand how to create customer value and relationships.

     

    plus-sign MKT 230 Consumer Behavior

    3 Semester Units

    Consumer Behavior focuses on the examination and application of consumer behavior principles to the development and implementation of marketing strategies. The text explains how "new media" (e.g., the expansive internet, enhanced cell phones, specialized search engines, E-commerce-oriented websites, and TiVo-like devices) has greatly influenced the marketer's ability to more precisely track and understand consumer behavior. Substantial attention is given to consumer online behavior, and the importance and power of the internet and other digital technologies in facilitationg consumer communications, as well as their ability to purchase products online.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Understand the psychological foundations of consumer behavior.
    • Apply the mechanisms of influence that are most likely to lead consumers to change their attitudes, their beliefs, and, most importantly, their actions.
    • Analyze how products and commercial messages often appeal to our senses.
    • Understand how consumers learn about products and services.

     

    plus-sign MKT 310 Advertising and Promotions

    3 Semester Units

    Advertising and Promotions will allow students to see a collective picture of integrated marketing communications. Focus is placed on business-to-business marketing concepts, international marketing discussions, brand management and various advertising and promotional tactics. This is an integrated approach with a solid advertising core.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Understand the Integrated Marketing Communication Foundation.
    • Analyze advertising tools, marketing power and message strategies.
    • Evaluate promotional tools, selling and public relations.
    • Become familiar with integration tools such as technology and business specific programs.

     

    plus-sign MKT 333 Marketing Management

    3 Semester Units

    Marketing Management offers a streamlined approach of current marketing management practices and theory, with a focus on helping companies, groups, and individuals adapt their marketing strategies and management to the marketplace of the twenty-first century. Outside cases and simulations are presented to help students utilize their marketing knowledge for successful marketing practices, and to effectively solve marketing problems with the latest tools and techniques.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Understand marketing management.
    • Consider ways to connect with customers.
    • Assess the importance of building strong brands.
    • Discuss shaping the market offerings.
    • Analyze the importance of communicating value.
    • Strategize how to create long-term growth.

     

    plus-sign BCJ 100 Introduction to Criminal Justice

    3 Semester Units

    Introduction to Criminal Justice provides an introduction to the criminal justice system. The primary goal of this course is to develop a general understanding of the criminal justice system’s response to crime in society. It is important to note that the general theme of this course involves the delicate balance between community interests and individual rights that criminal justice decision making requires. This theme will be explored by examining the criminal justice process in some detail, focusing on how the system is structured to respond to crime.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Understand criminal justice as the system of law enforcement, taking into account both theory and practice
    • Explain both positions in the individual rights versus public-order debate
    • Discuss the various theories dealing with the causes of crime
    • Discuss the development of law in Western democracies
    • Describe situations in which law enforcement officials may be required to use force and create guidelines to determine whether or not excessive force has been used
    • Evaluate the effectiveness of public versus private prisons
    • Understand how advances in technology stimulate social change.
    • Explain the relationship between drug abuse, social problems and crime.

     

    plus-sign BCJ 230 Criminal Investigation

    3 Semester Units

    Juvenile Justice is an overview of the criminal investigation field. To gain information related to crimes, course topics cover specific techniques for conducting a preliminary investigation, gather evidence and make arrests. Students also learn the procedures for interviewing witnesses and suspects, processing crime scenes and conducting a basic forensic examination of evidence. The course may include practice in writing up reports from crime scenes.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Understand rules of evidence and arrest.
    • Discuss the investigating of major crimes including crimes of violence, sexual assaults, robbery, arson, bombing, hate crimes, burglary and the drug scene.
    • Discuss the process of basic investigative leads and informants.
    • Know the process of control of a crime scene, crime scene investigation, recording the crime scene and locating witnesses.

     

    plus-sign BCJ 240 Procedures in the Justice System

    3 Semester Units

    Procedures in the justice system introduces students to the procedural aspects of the criminal justice system systematically, making the concepts easy to apply to any state’s specific procedural laws. Detailed coverage of the Exclusionary Rule and Miranda procedures will be presented, and a balanced coverage of consensual encounter, detention, and arrest will be explored.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Discuss the law of constitutional criminal procedures.
    • Understand criminal procedures in its social, political, and historical contexts.
    • Review the purposes and rules that emerge from cases.

     

    plus-sign BCJ 351 Forensic Science

    3 Semester Units

    Forensic Science is designed to make the subject of forensic science comprehensible to a wide variety of students who are, or plan to be, aligned with the forensic science profession.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Define and distinguish forensic science and criminalistics.
    • Describe proper techniques for packaging common types of physical evidence.
    • Understand the difference between qualitative and quantitative analysis.
    • Understand the use of DNA computerized databases in criminal investigation.

     

    plus-sign PSY 102 Introduction to Psychology

    3 Semester Units

    Introduction to Psychology introduces the methods and findings of contemporary psychology. Topics include a survey of biology and behavior, sensory process, human development, perception, learning and motivation. Emotion, personality, abnormal behavior, therapy and social interaction are also examined to provide students with a solid understanding of the facts, principles and theories which make up the field of psychology.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Define psychology.
    • Review brain function and explain how it affects behavior.
    • Discuss learning and memory.
    • Summarize growth and development principals.

     

    plus-sign PSY 220 Developmental Psychology

    3 Semester Units

    Developmental Psychology introduces students to the scientific study of patterns of change and stability that occur as we move through the process of human development from conception to death. Various theories of development will be presented, and an emphasis on physical, emotional, cognitive, and psychosocial changes throughout the life-span will be discussed.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Define the lifespan perspective.
    • Identify the physical and cognitive changes that occur during each developmental period.
    • Review the social and personality characteristics of each age group.

     

    plus-sign PSY 380 Personality Theories

    3 Semester Units

    Personality Theories presents an in-depth look at a number of classical and current personality theories, providing an explanation and interpretation of personality development from several different theoretical approaches. Classic theory is integrated with the latest research and current topics, preparing students to apply theoretical approaches to better understand the particular individuals and personalities they may encounter in their professional and personal lives.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe the major classic and current personality theories
    • Describe the research methods used in personality research
    • Understand the role of early experience in personality formation
    • Use personality theories to help understand human behavior

     

    plus-sign PSY 408 Abnormal Psychology

    3 Semester Units

    Abnormal Psychology offers students an eclectic, multicultural approach to abnormal behavior, drawing on contributions from various disciplines and theoretical stances. The psychosocial and psychophysiological factors of abnormal behavior are examined, and the causes and classifications are discussed. Case vignettes and client experiences will be explored and combined with research based explanations of abnormal behavior.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Successfully discriminate between normal and abnormal behavior and identify the symptoms of various disorders.
    • Understand the various causes, symptoms and treatment of abnormal behavior.
    • Understand the basics of the DSM system and how it’s used.
    • Summarize issues related to mental health and treatment.

     

    plus-sign BAM 110 Introduction to Accounting

    3 Semester Units

    Introduction to Accounting reviews the basic approach to accounting with an emphasis on recording, measuring and communicating the accounting data of business. Basic accounting concepts will be explored, including the effects of transactions on financial statements, payroll accounting, accounting for professional and merchandising operations and state and federal income tax deductions.

    Course Objectives:

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Prepare an income statement, a statement of owner’s equity, and a balance sheet.
    • Understand the concept of journalizing: analyzing and recording business transactions into a journal.
    • Learn how to deposit, write, and endorse checks for a checking account.
    • Calculate gross pay, employee payroll tax deductions for federal income tax withholding, state income tax withholding, FICA (OASDI, Medicare), and net pay.
    • Understand how to record and post purchase and sale transactions.
    • Calculate depreciation using one of four methods: straight line, declining balance, units of production, and sum of the years’ digits.

     

    plus-sign BAM 223 Principles of Economics

    3 Semester Units

    Principles of Economics demonstrates the relevance of economics through real-world business examples. The first part of the course presents microeconomic analysis such as consumer behavior, market structure, firm strategy, and corporate governance. The latter part of the course provides a comprehensive coverage of macroeconomic models, theory and policy issues including GDP, payroll employment, long-run growth, and business cycles.

    Course Objectives:

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Discuss the foundations of economics as well as the role of models in economic analysis.
    • Discuss the variables that influence supply and demand and explain the effect of government-imposed price ceilings and floors.
    • Understand the structure and functions of firms and the Stock Market.
    • Discuss GDP and the difference between real and nominal GDP.

     

    plus-sign BAM 313 Introduction to Financial Management

    3 Semester Units

    Introduction to Financial Management introduces students to the elementary principles and motives of financial management, and covers basic fundamental principles of short-term financing, time value of money, risk and value, and cost. Students will understand the interrelationships underlying the various data and techniques in which financial decisions are based, and will be able to analyze financial data and apply basic concepts to make confident financial decisions in their respective business futures.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Understand the scope and environment of financial management.
    • Comprehend the valuation of financial assets.
    • Confidently understand investment in long term assets.
    • Analyze capital structure and dividend policy.

     

    plus-sign BAM 401 International Business

    3 Semester Units

    International Business reviews the key concepts of international trade ad the way it affects the nature of global economic activity. Concepts such as globalization, cultural and political environments, world financial environments, and global strategies are all explored to help students gain a global perspective and to be confident and familiar with international business operations.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Understand why companies engage in international business and why international business growth has accelerated.
    • Describe the different ways in which a company can accomplish its global objectives.
    • Understand and deal with cultural differences.
    • Illustrate the major means by which trade is restricted and regulated.
    • Identify the major characteristics of the foreign-exchange market and how governments control the flow of currencies across national borders.
    • Identify the dimensions that shape how managers develop strategy.
    • Introduce the ideas of export and import.
    • Comprehend why and how companies make foreign direct investments.
    • Profile the evolving understanding of the organization of international business.

     

    plus-sign BAM 317 Business Law

    3 Semester Units

    The concept of preventive law is central to a law course designed for business students. Business Law discusses law in a business context rather than in the abstract, employing the practical approach that using the law makes it easier to reach business objectives.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Apply critical thinking and legal reasoning in business situations.
    • Link the law to other business disciplines you study.
    • Understand how technology is affecting the law.
    • Incorporate ethics into your analysis of the legal environment of business.
    • Apply legal principles in a global context of business.

     

    plus-sign BAM 418 Small Business Management

    3 Semester Units

    Small Business Management presents an overview of entrepreneurship, including launching a new venture, managing an on-going venture, financial planning, taxation and other topics specific to entrepreneurs. Students will learn the necessary elements to successfully start, run and manage a small business and they will be able to apply those concepts and ideas within their business careers, even if they do not choose the entrepreneurial route.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Possess a well-grounded understanding of essential entrepreneurial business principles.
    • Develop an understanding of important business issues as they relate to new ventures.
    • Identify, appreciate, and assess the knowledge, attitudes, and skills of an entrepreneur.
    • Establish a level of confidence in creating a business plan as a tool to assess, create and communicate a business concept.

     

    plus-sign PSY 116 Psychology of Gender

    3 Semester Units

    Psychology of Gender examines the biological, cultural, and historical factors that influence the development of gender roles and identities. Stereotypes of masculinity and femininity are examined, and the impact that these ideas have on our lives at the personal, social, and institutional levels are explored.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Describe the development of stereotypes in children.
    • Understand the general sequence of childhood gender role development.
    • Develop critical thinking skills and apply them to the area of gender.
    • Describe how gender operates in biological and cultural ways.
    • Understand controversial issues that have profound implications for the way men and women perceive themselves.

     

    plus-sign PSY 228 Social Psychology

    3 Semester Units

    Social Psychology offers students an in-depth look at how people come to understand themselves and others in a social context, with considerable emphasis on sociology’s role in social psychology. Students will be given detailed examples of current research studies relating to each of the topics covered in this course such as stratification, deviance and mental health and illness. Each chapter of the text covered in this course will also introduce students to key sociological social psychologists whose research has made a significant contribution to the field.

    Course Objectives

    Upon successful completion of this course, students will be able to:

    • Characterize three major perspectives in sociological social psychology.
    • Differentiate between qualitative and quantitative research methods.
    • Determine how group processes affect identity.
    • Recognize important agents of socialization.
    • Identify physiological, social and behavioral components of emotions.

     

Did you know, California Coast University offers affordable tuition payment options to help you get the education you deserve?

sub-hero